Turkey Pot Pie for One Person

I’ve always loved chicken and turkey pot pie, likely because my mom does and she passed it on.  But I never made it myself, thinking it required a lot of fussing and that a turkey pot pie for one wasn’t terribly practical. I think it was the crust that scared me. However, I’ve started making more pies lately, since my brother has decided I am the designated holiday cook. And he really likes apple pie. 

So, for Thanksgiving, I made an apple pie, and the turkey, and then grabbed the remaining crust scraps, as well as turkey leftovers, and took it all home.  The pie scraps (from the all-butter crust) made the perfect topping for this turkey pot pie.  The bones were the basis for homemade stock, and the leftover cooked turkey became part of the filling.  If you don’t have turkey stock and/or leftovers, use chicken instead. 

I made my own crust and stock, but if you don’t have the time or inclination, store-bought will work just fine. If you can, get made in store stock, not the stuff in the can or box (it tastes better).  You could even get some cooked turkey from the deli counter. Then you have a semi-homemade dinner, without a lot of work.

Don’t be intimidated by the way, by the idea of making stock. It’s really easy. You just need bones (from turkey, chicken, beef or whatever kind of stock you want to make), water, salt and pepper, carrots, onions, and a bay leaf. Toss it all in a pot, bring to a boil, and then let it simmer for a couple of hours. I like to caramelize the bones and veggies in a bit of oil first, for more flavor.

I have adapted this from a food network recipe. I reduced the quantities and eliminated the celery and parsley.  If we were meant to eat celery, it would taste better and not get stuck in your teeth! 

It takes about an hour overall, in two stages. First make the filling, then add that to a six inch casserole dish, top it with the crust, and bake until golden brown.




Turkey Pot Pie for One Variations and Substitutions

  • Reduce the chicken broth to 1 3/4 C and add 1/4 cup of half and half
  • Add some sherry (about a tablespoon)
  • Add herbs, such as sage, thyme, and rosemary to the onions when you cook them
  • Substitute corn for the peas
  • Sauté some garlic with the onions

More Turkey Recipes

sweet and sour jelly turkey meatballsSweet and Sour Turkey Meatballs with Jelly and Chili Sauce

Classic comfort food that’s grown up and gotten sophisticated. Spicier, and not as sweet. You may lick the plate (my dad did).

 

easy spicy turkey soupQuick and Easy Spicy Leftover Turkey Soup

Use up that leftover holiday turkey with this south-of-the-border take on standard turkey soup. Tangy lime, spicy cayenne, and cool sour cream make the soup flavorful, rich, and satisfying.

cranberry chipotle turkey enchiladaCranberry Chipotle Turkey Enchilada

Earthy/spicy chipotle, and sweet tart cranberries combine for another Mexican-influenced treat. Use up the extra turkey, and the cranberry relish, all at once!

 

easy leftover turkey soupEasy Leftover Turkey Soup Recipe

Haven’t got the ingredients for something? Improvise! Swap the veggies, fake some Herbs de Provence, add some Riesling, and simmer. Ta da! Soup!

 

 




Cranberry Chipotle Turkey Enchilada

Thanksgiving is great, but finding new and different ways to use up the leftovers can be a bit of a challenge. However, it’s also an opportunity to be creative. I had an idea for a turkey cranberry chipotle turkey enchilada and went looking for cranberry chipotle salsa or even some cranberry relish in the supermarket.  The store had both, but I eventually decided I didn’t want to buy a whole jar (and end up with more leftovers to use up).  So I created my own instead.

I took some of the leftover turkey, a few craisins (dried sweetened cranberries), and added chipotle salsa which I already had (and could use for other recipes like chili or meatloaf). I combined them together to make cranberry chipotle turkey enchiladas.

If you already have cranberry relish or cranberry salsa from your own dinner that would work beautifully too.

It’s pretty simple. Just warm up the turkey, heat the tortilla in some oil, add the rest of the ingredients, and roll it up into an enchilada.

A few weeks ago, those tortillas were “crepes“, but this time I decided to use them as intended on the package!




 

Tools and Ingredients for Turkey Cranberry Chipotle Enchiladas

 


OXO Good Grips Box Grater

Much as I love my zester/microplane, there are some jobs that require a different tool. A box grater can slice or shred food better than a zester can. Use this to shred or slice cheese, carrots, onions, and potatoes or to coarsely grate citrus peels (use the microplane for finer results).

This particular grater comes with its own marked storage container, so you can measure while you’re grating and just make exactly the amount you need.


SilverStone Ceramic 8-Inch Deep Skillet, Chili Red

I don’t like the old-style non-stick pans, but I confess I am enjoying using my ceramic pan. I can make eggs, enchiladas, frittatas, and many other things without worrying about it sticking and it cleans up easily. So far, the coating has held up beautifully. I don’t have this exact pan, but if I had seen the red I would have gotten that one in a New York minute. Do keep the heat a bit lower than you would with a stainless steel pan, and be careful if you have a glass top stove.

More Turkey Recipes

easy spicy turkey soupQuick and Easy Spicy Turkey Soup

Turkey soup with south of the US border flavor from lime, cumin, and cayenne, topped with cooling sour cream.  Zippy, and easy.

 

easy leftover turkey soupLeftover Turkey Soup Recipe

If you’d prefer something more classic, this soup is more traditional.  It’s flexible too. Use whatever fresh or frozen veggies you have (potatoes, broccoli, carrots, peas), toss it all together with some wine and broth and let it simmer.

 

sweet and sour jelly turkey meatballsSweet and Sour Turkey Meatballs with Jelly and Chili Sauce

Remember those childhood jelly meatballs? These have a bit more oomph. They’ve grown up, gotten a bit spicier, and less sweet.  You may lick the plate!

 

turkey pot pie for one personTurkey Pot Pie for One Person

Perfectly sized for one, without making more leftovers. You don’t even have to make turkey (get it cooked from the deli instead). The crust is rich, flaky, and all butter.

 




Sweet and Sour Turkey Meatballs with Jelly and Chili Sauce

This recipe for sweet and sour turkey meatballs with jelly and chili sauce is comfort food that’s grown up and gone to the big city.

When I was a kid, my grandma used to make those classic grape jelly meatballs. Kind of sweet, but comforting and simple. As my tastes have gotten more sophisticated, I wanted something with more complex and “grownup” flavor: not quite as sweet, a little more sour, and with a bit of a spicy kick.

I replaced the grape jelly with no sugar strawberry jam (it’s sweetened only with juice, there’s no sugar or artificial sweetener), then added chili sauce, a bit of Tabasco and apple juice and got sweet and sour turkey meatballs.

My parents were visiting one day, and decided to stay for dinner. I had ground turkey and the rest of the ingredients in the fridge. I whipped up a batch of these, and I swear you’d think they’d never eaten before. Dad was sopping up the sauce with bread. Heck, he practically licked the plate! Maybe I should have called these “lick the plate clean sweet and sour meatballs.”

You make this recipe in two stages, first the meatballs, and then the sauce.  Put the meatballs in the oven for a few minutes to keep them from falling apart when you add them to the sauce.



Sweet and Sour Turkey Meatballs with Jelly and Chili Sauce Substitutions and Variations

  • Use beef instead of turkey
  • Replace the oatmeal with breadcrumbs
  • Try cranberry juice instead of apple cider (it will be a bit more tart)
  • Experiment with different jam flavors: strawberry, raspberry, four-fruit, sour cherry (you could even go back to good old grape)

Tools and Ingredients for This Recipe


St. Dalfour Strawberry Conserves

This jam (technically conserves) is sweetened only with juice. There’s no sugar and no artificial sweeteners. The other thing I like about it is that there aren’t any extra thickeners added (like maltodextrin) to bulk it up.


Black & Decker 2-Speed Food Chopper with 3-Cup Bowl

I’m not sure which I use more, this chopper or the immersion blender. If you make the recipe with oatmeal, this little gadget is great for grinding it up. It’s also good for chopping onions, potatoes, or whipping up a small batch of pesto. The bowl doubles as a storage bowl (it comes with its own lid).


OXO Good Grips Medium Cookie Scoop

Ever hear of a cookie scoop? I hadn’t, until recently. Ice cream sure, but not cookies. The more I think about it the more uses I come up with.

It would be great for meatballs, cookies, or the perfect scoop of tuna, egg, or potato salad. It has a soft handle that’s easy to grip (it was originally developed for someone with arthritis, but it works well for everyone). Dishwasher safe too.

More Turkey Recipes

Quick and Easy Spicy Leftover Turkey Soup

Easy Leftover Turkey Soup Recipe

Cranberry Chipotle Turkey Enchilada

Easy Italian Meatball Recipe for One (this recipe calls for beef, but turkey would work just fine)




Quick and Easy Spicy Leftover Turkey Soup

Every year after the holidays are over, we all end up with lots of leftover turkey. Lots and lots of it.  I’ve made a lot of the “standard” leftover turkey soup, with potatoes and carrots and broccoli.  This time I wanted something with more zip.  I had some turkey (naturally), some tomatoes, lime, and of course spices, so I decided to go for a south of the border flavor.  So, spicy leftover turkey soup was born.

Ironically, a friend (who translates books from English to Spanish) once told me there are no turkeys in South America, which made her job rather difficult when she had to translate some turkey recipes.

I suppose that makes this not strictly authentic Mexican food.  Authentic or not, the tangy lime, the spicy cayenne, and the cool sour cream make the soup flavorful, rich, and satisfying.




Quick and Easy Spicy Leftover Turkey Soup Substitutions and Variations

Since recipes are often meant to be guidelines, and since we don’t always have the exact ingredients handy, here are some substitutions:

  • If you don’t have a turkey carcass, use turkey thighs, depending on size, one or two should do it.
  • I used navy beans for the soup, you could use white kidney beans or pinto beans
  • Replace the diced tomatoes with 1/2 C peeled tomatoes (and smush them up)
  • Add a handful of frozen corn
  • Top with crumbled tortilla chips, or cut up some tortillas, fry them, and sprinkle them on top of the soup for extra crunch.

More Turkey Recipes

cranberry chipotle turkey enchiladaCranberry Chipotle Turkey Enchilada

A delicious way to use up holiday leftovers and transform the flavors.  This is sweet, spicy, and tangy too.

 

sweet and sour jelly turkey meatballsSweet and Sour Turkey Meatballs

Remember those jelly meatballs you had as a kid? They’ve now grown up and gotten more complex.  Less sweet, more spicy.

 

easy leftover turkey soupEasy Leftover Turkey Soup Recipe

The classic leftover turkey soup, chock-full of potatoes, carrots, and (shhh) frozen veggies. Why chop if you don’t have to?

 

turkey pot pie for one personTurkey Pot Pie for One Person

Tender turkey, sweet peas and carrots all wrapped in a flaky all-butter crust. Make the crust (as I did) or buy one. It’s all good.

 




Easy Leftover Turkey Soup Recipe

This easy leftover turkey soup recipe is great for a chilly spring or fall day.

It’s also a good way to use up cooked turkey after a holiday (just add the turkey during the final cooking stage).

Note: You’ll need a Dutch oven for this (since the pot has to go first on the stove, and then in the oven). If you don’t have one, use a soup pot and make the whole thing on the stove.

If you don’t have any leftover turkey handy,  use turkey thighs instead.

I had seen some boneless turkey thighs in the store, and bought them without really having a plan in mind for what to do with them.

I went searching on the internet for turkey soup and found a recipe for turkey stew, but that wasn’t quite what I wanted.  Plus, I didn’t have all the ingredients (since I hadn’t known I was going to make it!)

The original recipe called for celery,  turnips, and rutabaga (I’ve never met a rutabaga), none of which I had on hand.

So, I figured I would improvise and use what I did have to make soup.

A quick look in the pantry and fridge, turned up some potatoes, plus the turkey, a package of frozen veggies, and an open bottle of Riesling.  The original recipe also called for Herbs de Provence, which I didn’t have either, so I threw together some basil, tarragon, and thyme.




It came out really well! And, as a bonus, it warmed up my apartment beautifully.

This is a small batch recipe, and makes about 4-6 portions. Eat one and freeze the rest. Or, keep eating it all week (so you don’t have to cook again).

If you still need to use up more leftover turkey, or want a different flavor, check out this spicy turkey soup recipe.

More Delicious Small Batch Soup Recipes

easy spicy turkey soupQuick and Easy Spicy Leftover Turkey Soup

Want a bit more kick? This south-of-the-border flavored turkey soup has lime, cumin, and cayenne, tempered with cool sour cream on top.

 

chinese chicken noodle cabbage soupChinese Chicken Noodle Cabbage Soup for One Person

This is originally made with chicken, but turkey would work just fine too.  It could likely stand up to a more assertive hand with the spices too.

 


spicy beef noodle soup
Spicy Beef Noodle Soup for One

Clear your head, inhale deeply, and savor the fragrance. Ahhh. Only requires a few minutes work and pantry ingredients.

 

caldo verde soupCaldo Verde Soup

No leftover turkey here, though I suppose you could use turkey sausage, or extra turkey and amp up the spices with extra paprika, cayenne, and salt. But, it’s a quick soup with spicy sausage, potatoes, and bright spinach.