Vietnamese Baked Chicken with Lime

Great for a weeknight dinner, this Vietnamese baked chicken with lime is an easy meal that requires very little active work.  Measure, mince, and pour, then let it sit.  Once it’s finished marinating, all you have to do is cook it for half an hour. The ginger and garlic are warm and spicy, while the chili garlic sauce has a bit of a kick. The lime adds brightness and a citrusy tang that complements the spicy flavors and cools them down. 

The original recipe called for chili garlic paste, palm sugar, and fish sauce.  And, it’s true, those ingredients would be more authentic. However, they also violate my own rules about avoiding  hard-to-find or one use ingredients.  I don’t want to buy an entire bottle or brick of something (like palm sugar) just to have it sit there. And where would I even find palm sugar? Nope.

So, I cheated.  I used chili garlic sauce (not paste), swapped brown sugar for palm sugar, and ditched the fish sauce in favor of Worcestershire sauce (which does have some anchovies in it). I also wanted (for personal preference) to avoid all the salt in the fish sauce.

Marinating, even for a short time, helps the chicken absorb lots of flavor. Just don’t let it sit too long or it will get mushy from the citrus.

When you’re ready to start cooking, just pour out the marinade, pop the chicken in the oven, and wait half an hour. Dinner is done!




Vietnamese Baked Chicken with Lime

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 35 minutes

Category: dinner

Cuisine: Vietnamese

one

Vietnamese Baked Chicken with Lime

Ingredients

  • 1 chicken thigh (leave the skin and bone in place)
  • 1T soy sauce
  • 1 T Worcestershire sauce (if you like fish sauce, use that)
  • 1 T brown sugar
  • 3/4 tsp fresh ginger, grated
  • 1/2 tsp chili garlic sauce
  • 1 tsp lime juice, freshly squeezed
  • 1/4 tsp lime zest
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 T cooking oil

Instructions

  1. lIn a small bowl, mix the marinade ingredients (soy sauce, Worcestershire, sugar, ginger, chili garlic sauce, lime juice and zest, garlic and oil).  Pour that into a zip lock bag, and add the chicken.  Close the bag, and shake it around so the marinade covers the chicken.Let that sit for half an hour, or up to four hours (in the fridge).
  2. About fifteen minutes before you’re ready to cook, remove the tray from your toaster oven and line it with foil. Then preheat the toaster oven to 425 degrees. Also take the chicken out of the fridge to come to room temperature.
  3. Take the chicken out of the bag and set it on top of a wire rack, skin side up,  and then place the rack over the lined toaster oven tray.  This will reduce cleanup a bit and help keep the chicken from getting soggy.
  4. Bake for about 30-35 minutes. Remove from oven and let the chicken rest for five minutes. Serve with rice and garnish with lime.

Vietnamese Baked Chicken with Lime Substitutions and Variations

  • add some soy sauce to the marinade
  • swap the lime zest for lemongrass (you can buy lemongrass paste, which is easier to find in western markets than the stalks)
  • chop up some cilantro and add that to the marinade
  • if you do like fish sauce, I’m told Red Boat and Three Crabs are good brands (avoid the Taste of Thai, it’s full of sugar)

More Chicken Recipes

One Pot Chicken with Balsamic Vinegar Sauce

Jewish Chicken Curry Chitarnee

Crispy Lemon Chicken Thigh Recipe for One

Chili Citrus Chicken Thigh Recipe for One




Spaghetti with Green Olives and Lemon Panko

Since it’s spring and everything is turning green (and yellow and pink), it’s time to take advantage and turn from heavy food to something lighter and fresher. Spaghetti with green olives and lemon panko hits all those buttons. It’s light, it’s green, and it’s a bit of a flavor bomb that will wake up your taste buds.

It’s got zesty garlic, and earthy fresh spinach, paired with tangy capers, briny olives and a burst of citrus. Crispy, golden-brown panko crumbs mixed with dill and lemon zest add a bit of crunch.

In fact, I shared it with some friends and one of them said, “Oh I want that! I want it now! But I’m at work! Sob.”

I hate that the internet doesn’t include a “push here for spaghetti option”!

I found the original recipe on Bon Appetit, but I changed it a bit.  First, it had anchovies. Nope! Nope!  Second, I swapped the original parsley for some spinach instead. One, I had lots of spinach. And two, I don’t like parsley all that much, so there’s no point in buying a whole bunch of it. The spinach I will use for other meals.

One more small thing. The recipe said to cut some of the olives in half and then chop up the rest. It may have said to chop up the capers too (the instructions were a bit unclear). I started to chop the olives and then decided it was silly, so I stopped.

It also occurred to me after I made it that I could prepare the pasta first, then keep it warm while I cooked the panko and mixed everything else together.  Just drain and wipe the saucepan, add the oil and panko, and proceed with the rest of the recipe. That way it’s only one pot!

I used ordinary green olives (because they were handy). I think I will try it next time with castelvetrano olives instead, since they are my favorite olive (and taste great with pasta).

Oh dear, I’m revising and internet commenting my own recipe! Ha!




Spaghetti with Green Olives and Lemon Panko

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Category: dinner

Cuisine: Italian

one

Spaghetti with Green Olives and Lemon Panko

Ingredients

  • 3 T olive oil
  • 1 T panko (Japanese breadcrumbs)
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 tsp dried dill (or 1 T fresh)
  • 1/4 tsp grated lemon zest
  • 3 ounces spaghetti
  • 1 garlic clove, mashed
  • 1/4 C fresh spinach, roughly chopped
  • 2 T chopped fresh basil
  • 1/4 cup green olives, pitted, halved
  • 2 1/4 tsp drained capers
  • 2 T grated Parmesan cheese, plus more for serving
  • 1 1/2 tsp fresh lemon juice

Instructions

  1. Heat one tablespoon of the olive oil in a medium size skillet.
  2. Add the panko and cook stirring, over medium heat, for a minute or two. Watch it closely so it doesn't burn. Once the panko turns golden brown, remove it from the pan and spoon it on a paper towel so it will drain. Add salt and pepper and mix in the dill and lemon zest.
  3. Boil water in a large pot, add salt, and then add the spaghetti. Stir the pasta when you add it, so it doesn't stick. Once the spaghetti is done (about 8-10 minutes), remove from the pot and drain nearly all the water. Keep about 2 T of the water in reserve (this will help thicken the sauce).
  4. While the spaghetti is cooking, mash the garlic. Use the broad edge of a wide knife to smash it, and then smear it around on the cutting board with the side of the knife to make a paste. Put the mashed garlic, spinach, basil, olives, and capers in a large bowl. Now add the rest of the olive oil. Toss it all together and season with salt and pepper.
  5. Add the pasta and the half the reserved cooking water to the spinach olive mixture. Mix it all together so that the pasta is covered. If it's too dry, add more of the pasta liquid.
  6. Squeeze the lemon you used for the zest and add 1 1/2 tsp of juice to the sauce.
  7. Top that with the panko mixture and more Parmesan cheese.

Spaghetti with Green Olives and Lemon Panko Substitutions and Variations

  • like anchovies and parsley? Go for it!
  • use castelvetrano olives instead, they are firmer and more buttery
  • top the whole thing with some red pepper flakes
  • add more garlic
  • use the sauce over cooked fish (such as cod or tilapia)

More Spaghetti Recipes

Spaghetti with Spinach and Lemon Cream Sauce

Linguine with Garlic and Olive Oil

Pasta with Olives Tomatoes and Capers or Puttanesca

Summer Pasta with Green Olives and Feta Cheese




Lamb Keema with Potatoes and Broccoli

I usually plan my meals, not precisely, but generally write down six or seven entrees and build from there. But, I had some ground lamb in the freezer and didn’t quite know what to do with it. My first thought was shepherd’s pie.  But that requires first making mashed potatoes and then making the meat mixture. Too much work.  Then I dug into my bookmarks and found a recipe for keema (or kima).  She says it’s her most requested recipe! Keema is, roughly speaking, Pakistani shepherd’s pie (or maybe cottage pie, since the original is made with beef). It’s got ground meat, potatoes, and some veggies.  And, best of all it only requires one pot!  That’s my kind of cooking.

I’ve seen this spelled keema, and kima or called keema aloo (for the potatoes).  However you spell it, you get a savory, not too spicy all-in-one pot meal. A meal which is ready in about half an hour too.

I used ground lamb, but ground beef is fine if that’s what you have.  You could probably even make it with ground turkey if you wanted to. Chicken would probably be a bit bland.

Don’t be put off by the ingredients list. It’s mostly just adding small amounts of spices into the pan. You don’t even really have to measure.  Just shake the jars a couple of times (if you have the kind with the small holes in the lids) or grab a pinch.

This is generally made with peas, but I didn’t have any so I tossed in some frozen broccoli instead. You could use the peas or whatever other veggies you have such as: cauliflower, cabbage, or peppers. I used Yukon gold potatoes, but regular russet potatoes will work too. You could even substitute sweet potatoes if you like.

As written, this recipe is relatively mild. If you want more heat, increase the curry, and/or add some fresh hot peppers or red pepper flakes.

If you want to go all out with the starch, you can serve this with rice or naan.  I just made a side salad (trying to get my veggies in!).




Lamb Keema with Potatoes and Broccoli

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 35 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

Category: dinner

Cuisine: Pakistani

one

Lamb Keema with Potatoes and Broccoli

Ingredients

  • 1T cooking oil or butter
  • 1/4 C chopped onion
  • 1 small clove garlic, minced
  • 1/4 ground lamb or beef
  • 1/4 tsp curry powder
  • pinch salt
  • pinch pepper
  • pinch cumin
  • pinch cinnamon
  • pinch ginger (ground)
  • pinch turmeric
  • 1 small to medium potato, peeled and cut into cubes
  • 1/3 C diced tomatoes
  • 1/3 C frozen broccoli or peas

Instructions

  1. Heat the oil or melt the butter in a medium skillet.
  2. Add the chopped onion and the minced garlic and cook about five minutes until the onion softens (watch to make sure it doesn't burn).
  3. Crumble the chopped meat into the pan and brown it, cooking about 10 minutes.
  4. Add the spices, salt, and pepper.
  5. Now, put in the cubed potato and the tomatoes.
  6. Cover the pot and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes. Check it once or twice and add a little water if necessary to keep it from drying out.
  7. After 10-15 minutes, put in the broccoli (or peas) and cook another 10 minutes.

 

Lamb Keema with Potatoes and Broccoli Substitutions and Variations

  • Try a different kind of protein, such as beef or ground turkey
  • Use peas instead of broccoli
  • Add some coconut
  • Spice it up with hot peppers, more curry, or fresh ginger instead of ground
  • Add some yogurt

More Lamb Recipes

Turkish Lamb Burgers

Moroccan Lamb Stew with Almonds and Raisins

Lamb and Lentil Soup Recipe

 




Garlic Ginger Turmeric Rice

An online food group I belong to is celebrating “rice month.” The idea is to highlight a recipe featuring, well rice.  Someone suggested that nearly every culture uses rice so everyone ought to be able to find something to fit the theme.  Unfortunately, I come from a long line of noodle and dumpling people.  So, at first I was stumped.  What could I possibly make for this challenge?  Then I had an idea.  I could borrow a “sister” culture!  Eastern European Jewish people focus heavily on noodles, but the Sephardim (from Asia, India, the Middle East, etc.) have plenty of rice dishes.  So, I looked through my cookbooks and found garlic ginger turmeric rice.

It’s a Bene Israel recipe, meaning that it was created by the Jewish population in India.  You might almost call it a pulao. I’ve adapted this recipe from The Book of Jewish Food.  Her version served six.  Mine is about three servings (because extra rice is always good; more on that later).

This particular rice dish is packed with garlic, ginger, green cardamon pods, and a pinch of turmeric for that beautiful yellow color. It’s tasty (and it fights germs too, which made it even more appealing since I’m still fighting the creeping crud!).  Don’t be put off by all the garlic and the ginger, both start out spicy and sharp but mellow and become almost sweet as they cook.  The cardamom adds a complex taste; it’s a bit minty, with a hint of citrus and a spicy/warm flavor.  The original calls for basmati rice (which I didn’t have), but ordinary long grain white rice will do just as well. If you use the basmati rice, rinse it several times before starting to cook it.

.

 




Garlic Ginger Turmeric Rice

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Category: side dish

Cuisine: Indian

two or three

Garlic Ginger Turmeric Rice

Ingredients

  • 1 cup white rice
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/2 medium onion, chopped roughly
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1/2 inch ginger, peeled
  • 1/2 tsp. turmeric
  • 1 T plus 1 tsp vegetable oil
  • 4 whole peppercorns
  • 2 whole cloves
  • 3 green cardamom pods
  • 1 small stick cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp salt

Instructions

  1. Wash and drain the rice.
  2. Blend the onion, garlic, ginger, and 2 tsp of the oil in a food processor or mini chopper until it forms a paste.
  3. Pour the rest of the oil into a saucepan (about 2 quarts). Add the whole spices (peppercorns, cloves, cinnamon, and cardamom to the pan and cook on medium-high for a minute or two. The smell should start to waft through your kitchen and they may pop.*
  4. Scrape the garlic ginger mixture out of the mini chopper and add it to the pan with the spices.
  5. Reduce the heat to low, and stir everything around until the garlic/ginger becomes fragrant.
  6. Now add the rice, salt, and the water and stir well.
  7. Increase the heat and bring the mixture to a boil.
  8. Once it starts boiling, reduce the heat. Stir the rice, and simmer, with the pot covered, over low heat for 15-18 minutes.
  9. Once the rice is done, let it sit for a few minutes and steam.

Notes

*You can either leave the spices as is, and then make sure to pick them out of the rice when it's finished, or scoop them out into a tea ball. Then put the tea ball into the pot, and continue on with the rest of the recipe.

Turn Your Garlic Ginger Turmeric Rice Side Dish into A Main Dish

As is, this is a side dish. But with a bit of extra effort, it can become a main dish too.  There are a couple of ways to do this. For example, you could make it more substantial by cooking up some chicken or adding leftover pre-cooked chicken to the rice. Or, cook up some spinach and fry and egg (in the same pan if you want), and add that to the top.  You can do the same thing with the leftovers a few days. later. Instant food!

The recipe says that for special occasions, this dish was often served topped with blanched almonds and raisins. While this wasn’t a fancy occasion, I decided to do it anyway. I didn’t have blanched almonds, so I just roughly chopped a few whole ones.  Soak the raisins in water a bit before you use them, in order to soften them.

More Rice Recipes

Easy Lentils and Rice Recipe

Black Beans and Rice Recipe for One Person

Lamb Merguez Sausage with Rice and Vegetables




Schezuan Chili Noodles

Stuffy head? Allergies starting to act up?  I’ve got the creeping crud, so this szechuan chili noodle recipe immediately caught my attention. It’s a cousin to Dan Dan noodles, but a lot simpler, with ingredients that are easier to find if you live in a western country and far fewer steps. Dan dan noodles require making the chili oil, then the meat mixture, and finally noodles and vegetables.  For this recipe, you only have to make the oil and the noodles. Call it Chinese-inspired.

You can make this with ground chicken or pork, or leave it as is (fewer things to buy and cook) and have it as a vegetarian dish. I didn’t have any ground meat handy (it was all in the freezer) so I went without. If you don’t have baby bok choy, green cabbage will do just as well.

You can get pre-made chili oil, but (at least the brand I got) has an odd metallic taste that I don’t like. It’s easy enough to make yourself, and only requires one extra small bowl (no additional pots!) to hold the mixture while you make the rest of the recipe.

Now about the actual noodles. The recipe I adapted this from used what she called “wide Chinese egg noodles.” I had never seen that.  I looked and couldn’t find anything easily. Then in the comments she said it was really pappardelle. OK! Easier to find (and I love pappardelle). Plus then I get to make White Ragu Pappardelle  with the rest of the pasta. If you want to be more authentic, use real Chinese wheat noodles or rice noodles.

One final recipe note.  The original calls for chili paste (sambal oelek), which is essentially just a jar of spicy, ground chilis.  You can get it online, or check your grocer. If you can’t find it, substitute garlic chili sauce (and possibly remove the garlic clove from the recipe, depending on how spicy you like your food).  If not, then substitute sriracha or even hot sauce instead.

The whole thing comes together in about 30 minutes or so.




Schezuan Chili Noodles

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Cuisine: Chinese

one

Schezuan Chili Noodles

Ingredients

  • 1 T cooking oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • pinch to 1/8 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1/4 inch fresh ginger, grated
  • 1 tsp sesame seeds
  • 1 T plus 1 tsp soy sauce
  • 2 tsp rice vinegar
  • 1 tsp honey
  • 2 1/2 tsp water
  • 1/2 - 1 tsp chili paste
  • 1 scallion chopped, plus extra for garnish
  • 1/2 cup baby bok choy, chopped (or use cabbage if you prefer)

Instructions

  1. Fill a 2 quart saucepan (medium size) with water and bring to a boil.
  2. First start by making the chili oil. You’ll need a good sized (large) skillet. Heat that over medium heat. Then add the oil, garlic, ginger, and chili. Cook, or about 5 minutes, until the garlic becomes fragrant. Stir it occasionally and keep an eye on it so the garlic doesn’t burn.
  3. Add the sesame seeds and stir, cooking about another 30 seconds. Then carefully pour the mixture into a bowl.
  4. The water should be boiling by now, so add the noodles and cook according to the package directions. Packaged pappardelle noodles should take about 7-10 minutes to cook. Fresh ones will cook faster, about three or four minutes.
  5. While the noodles are cooking, in a separate, small bowl, mix together the soy sauce, vinegar, chili paste, and water.
  6. Add the scallions to the skillet you used to cook the chili oil and cook for two or three minutes. Pour the soy sauce mixture into the skillet and add the box copy. Simmer for 3-5 minutes until the vegetables are cooked. Stir the mixture occasionally so the box chop gets coated with the sauce.
  7. Drain the noodles and add them to the skillet as well as half of the chili oil mixture. Stir everything to coat. Pour into a bowl and serve with the remaining chili oil and extra scallions.

Szechuan Chili Noodles Tools and Ingredients


Huey Fong Sambal Oelek Chili Paste
Made by the same company that produces the wildly popular sriracha sauce. This is spicier, since it has more chili in it.  Put it on noodles, in omelettes, or in soup.

 

Huy Fong Chili Garlic Sauce

The same great chili paste, plus extra garlic! Use it in Pad Thai, mix into eggs, stir fries, soups, or any food that needs a kick of flavor. I sometimes put it in my caldo verde. Doesn’t have sugar (unlike the sriracha sauce) so it’s more potent (also good if you want to avoid extra sugar).

 

More Asian and Chinese Noodle Recipes

Chinese Chicken Noodle Cabbage Soup for One Person

Spicy Sesame Noodles Recipe

Easy Singapore Noodles with Chicken 

Spicy Beef Noodle Soup for One

 




Quick Caldo Verde Soup

Caldo Verde is a traditional Portuguese soup that’s made in one pot. And, it takes about half an hour to cook. It’s filling, spicy, and great for cold weather. The usual way to make this is with kale and linguiça, which is a garlicky pork Portuguese sausage. Except, I don’t like kale.  Some use collard greens instead, or cabbage. I didn’t have cabbage, but I did have spinach.  As far as I’m concerned, that works! It’s still a bitterish green and it takes less time to cook too.

This is good right away, but like many soups, it’s even better after it sits for a day or two.  I’ve cut the recipe from six servings to about 2 or 3, depending on how hungry you are.

It does come with a few minor cooking decisions.  You can cut the greens up roughly, or chop everything up into fine ribbons.  And, you can either purée the soup, or leave it as is. I went with rough chopping and skipped the purée this time, mostly because I was feeling lazy.  The last thing I made was pizza and I somehow got the tomato sauce everywhere: the stove, the floor, the cabinets, the sink.  I’ve had enough cleanup to last me for a while, so I didn’t want to clean one extra thing (even a stick blender).

Also, if you can’t find the Portuguese sausage, any other garlicky sausage will do just fine.




Quick Caldo Verde Soup

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 35 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

Category: soup

Cuisine: Portuguese

2

Quick Caldo Verde Soup

Ingredients

  • 2 tsp butter
  • 4-5 oz garlicky pork sausage, sliced (about a four inch piece)
  • 1 small onion, diced (about 1/2 cup)
  • 1 clove garlic, sliced
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • 2-3 Yukon gold potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 2 C chicken broth
  • 1 1/2 cup fresh spinach, washed and roughly chopped

Instructions

  1. Melt the butter in a Dutch oven.
  2. Add the sausage and brown for 5 minutes.
  3. Remove the sausage and set aside.
  4. Add the onions and the garlic and season to taste with salt and pepper.
  5. Add half the olive oil as necessary to keep the veggies from drying out.
  6. Add the chicken broth and the potatoes.
  7. Raise the heat to medium-high and bring the soup to a boil.
  8. Turn the heat down and let the soup simmer for 25 to 30 minutes, until the potatoes are soft.
  9. Add the spinach and the cooked sausage and cook for a minute or two until the spinach wilts.
  10. Add the second teaspoon of olive oil and serve.

Caldo Verde Soup Substitutions and Variations

  • Use a mixture of baking potatoes (Russett) and Yukon Gold potatoes for different textures
  • If you don’t have the linguiça, try chorizo or andouille, merguez, or any garlicky sausage you have; even pepperoni in a pinch
  • Try it with cabbage (or kale) if you prefer
  • Skip the sausage entirely, replace the chicken broth with vegetable broth and make it vegetarian. If you want it vegan, use olive oil instead of butter.

More Sausage and Spinach Recipes

Lentil Bean Sausage Soup

Lamb Merguez Sausage with Rice and Vegetables

Spinach and Feta Cheese Omelette

Spaghetti with Spinach and Lemon Cream Sauce

 




One Pot Chicken with Balsamic Vinegar Sauce

Adapted from a Jacques Pépin recipe, chicken with balsamic vinegar sauce is an easy and satisfying one pot meal.  There’s also a secret ingredient you might not expect (especially from someone known for French cooking).  It’s…ketchup! It deepens the flavor and provides just a little hint of spice and sweetness.  The balsamic vinegar adds a slightly tart, fruity tang that complements the sweetness of the ketchup and the cooked onions.

He used chicken breasts, but I find those tend to dry out (unless you’re really careful). Not to mention they’re costly, and don’t pack nearly as much flavor as chicken thighs do. So chicken thighs it is. Changing the type of chicken I used also meant altering the cooking method a bit. Instead of baking in an oven, I did a fricassee, meaning brown the chicken, add the liquid, and then let it cook on the stove top.

Chicken thighs have to cook longer than breasts do.  However, doing it my way means you only need a single skillet.  There’s no putting anything in the oven and no need to use two different pots (or worry if your skillet is oven safe).  That also means there’s a lot less cleanup. Less cleaning up is always a good thing, as far as I’m concerned.

Two more slight twists. The original recipe called for shallots. I never have those around, and I wasn’t about to buy them for one recipe (you know how I hate that). So, I cut up some garlic and onions instead (since they’re kissing cousins so to speak). If you have shallots, or don’t mind buying them, go right ahead and use them. He also said to sprinkle the chicken with chives. I didn’t have that either, so I used some fresh rosemary.

As I type this, I’m wondering if I’m spiraling into Internet recipe comment territory: “Great recipe! I changed X, and Y, and Z, and then I didn’t follow the directions at all, but it turned out great!” Well, it did turn out great, so I guess it’s OK.

The whole thing is done in about 35 minutes, so it’s perfect for a weeknight meal when you don’t want to fuss (because you just want dinner).




One Pot Chicken with Balsamic Vinegar Sauce

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 35 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

Category: dinner

Cuisine: American

one

One Pot Chicken with Balsamic Vinegar Sauce

Ingredients

  • 2 tsp unsalted butter, divided
  • 3/4 tsp olive oil
  • 1 chicken thigh
  • pinch salt
  • pinch black pepper
  • one small clove garlic, minced
  • 1 T onion, minced
  • 1/4 cup mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 T balsamic vinegar
  • 3/4 tsp ketchup
  • 2 T water
  • fresh rosemary (about 1/4 tsp, optional)

Instructions

  1. Heat 1 tsp of the butter and the olive oil in a medium sized skillet. Season the chicken with salt and pepper and add it to the pan with the hot butter/oil mixture.
  2. Brown the chicken, on medium heat, turning occasionally, for about five minutes total
  3. Remove the chicken and set it aside on a plate or cutting board.
  4. Add the garlic, onion, and mushrooms to the skillet and cook for about a minute (leave the heat on a medium setting).
  5. Then add the vinegar and the ketchup. Cook another minute.
  6. Return the chicken thigh to the pan and pour in the water.
  7. Cook about twenty minutes on medium heat. The liquid should be reduced by about half.
  8. Add the remaining teaspoon of butter and stir it around.
  9. Spoon the sauce over the chicken, sprinkle the rosemary over it, if using, and serve.

More Chicken Thigh Recipes

Chicken with Olives and Tomatoes for One

Chili Citrus Chicken Thigh Recipe for One

Jewish Chicken Curry Chitarnee

Feta Brined Roast Chicken Recipe for One




Spaetzle Recipe Without a Spaetzle Maker

OK, two confessions. The first is that this spaetzle recipe is nearly identical to Tyler Florence’s spaetzle recipe.  Also, his version claims it’s six servings. I suppose that’s as a side dish. Or maybe it’s a typo. My second confession is that it was soooo good I ate the whole thing. All at once.

First of all, it was delicious! But that alone wouldn’t make it something I’d normally share, especially since I made so few changes. The important thing about this recipe isn’t that I adapted it or altered it. What I did do was figure out a way to make it without any special equipment.

I hate single use gadgets and while the recipe is really good, I wasn’t going to go out and buy a special spaetzle maker. Besides my dislike of one-use gadgets, there’s just no place to keep the thing. Tyler’s recipe, as well as many others, suggest using a slotted spoon or a cheese grater instead of the spaetzle machine. I tried both of those. They just didn’t work very well.

Then I had a brainstorm. The potato masher! It worked perfectly! Just hold it in one hand, scoop up some batter with a spoon in the other hand, and scrape the spoon back and forth over the masher (like you were grating cheese). Ta da!!!

You want the flat-bottomed sort of masher, with lots of holes, not the squiggly kind that looks like a bicycle rack.

There’s no brand name on the one I have, so I don’t know exactly what it is, but the masher on the left is the closest I could find. The holes on mine are rectangular, not round, but I think that will be OK, since real spaetzle maker holes are round. The key is that there’s a flat surface, with lots of holes in it.

I included the image below so you could see what it should look like.  That design will work fine.  The one on the right will mash potatoes, but will be useless for spaetzle.




Flat potato masher
Squiggly potato masher



Auto Draft

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Total Time: 35 minutes

Category: lunch

Cuisine: German

one

Auto Draft

A super-easy way to get your noodle fix. And, with my method you don't need any special tools either.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter

Instructions

  1. Get two bowls, one large, and one medium. Put the flour, salt, pepper, and nutmeg in the larger bowl, and mix them together.
  2. Now get the smaller bowl and whisk together the milk and eggs.
  3. Make a depression in the center of the flour mixture and pour the milk-egg mixture into it.
  4. Push the flour in from the sides toward the milk-egg mixture and then gradually mix everything together to form a dough.
  5. It should be fairly smooth and thick. Let the mixture rest for at least 10-15 minutes.
  6. While the dough is resting, fill a 3 quart saucepan with water and bring it to a boil. Once it's boiling, turn the heat down to a simmer.
  7. Now, grasp your potato masher by the handle with one hand, holding it with the flat mashing side down. Pour a spoonful of batter over the mashing head. Then scrape it back and forth with the spoon (like you were grating cheese). This will make your spaetzle.
  8. Do it in batches, so the pot doesn't get too full. Cook the spaezle for three minutes or so, until they start to float to the top. Stir every once in a while so they don't stick. Then remove them with a slotted spoon, drain, and set aside while you make the next batch.
  9. Once the spaetzle are cooked, heat the butter in a large skillet. Or be lazy and reuse the saucepan. Add the spaetzle, and turn and toss them so they are coated with the butter. Cook for a couple of minutes, then sprinkle with salt and pepper and serve.

Spaetzle Recipe Substitutions and Variations

  • Serve with grated cheese, like Emmenthaler or Gruyère
  • Cook some onions until caramelized, add them to the spaetzle (with or without cheese)
  • Cut off small pieces of dough and flick them into a pot of simmering chicken soup or broth (like mini dumplings!)

More Pasta Recipes

White Ragu Pappardelle Pasta for One

Egg and Pasta Gratin with Chives

Smoked Salmon Pasta with Tomato Cream Sauce

Pasta with Olives Tomatoes and Capers or Puttanesca




Smoked Salmon Artichoke Salad

This super-easy smoked salmon artichoke salad requires absolutely no cooking. And it’s ready in about 10 minutes.  It not only looks good (check out all those beautiful colors: green, orange, pink, and red), but it’s got the zing of citrus, smoky, salty salmon and zesty marinated artichokes.  The balsamic dressing and the parmesan add a savory flavor. It’s a great combination because the bitter greens from the spinach play off against the sweet oranges, the salty parmesan, and the smoked fish.

It’s a great lunch just for yourself (especially if you’re hungry and in a hurry). Or, scale it up and serve it to company. It’s elegant enough for a party if you’re having one.

Full credit for the original recipe goes to Azlin Bloor, who serves bite-size individual smoked salmon salad servings (with blood oranges) as a fancy appetizer for her catering clients.

Since we’re not catering, or necessarily fancy, this version will just cut everything up and serve it all together in a single bowl.  You can use blood oranges if you like. I went with the regular navel oranges, since they seem to be particularly good this year.

I also used smoked salmon bits (which my grocery store sells for less than the carefully sliced kind).  Look for it in your local store, and save a bit of money.  Lastly,  I substituted spinach for arugula, since I prefer it, and it’s more readily available.




Smoked Salmon Artichoke Salad

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 10 minutes

Category: salad

Cuisine: Continental

1

Smoked Salmon Artichoke Salad

A smoked salmon and artichoke salad that's both pretty to look at and delicious to eat. There's sweet oranges, green spinach, and salty salmon. Plus shaved parmesan for a bit of umami.

Ingredients

    Salad
  • 1 orange
  • 2 oz smoked salmon
  • 2 oz marinated artichokes
  • 1/4  red onion
  • 1/4 cucumber
  • 1 handful spinach
  • shaved parmesan
    Dressing
  • 2 1/4 tsp balsamic vinegar
  • 2 1/4 tsp white wine vinegar
  • 1 1/2 tsp extra virgin olive oil
  • a few grains of salt

Instructions

  1. Peel the orange, and cut it into wedges.
  2. If you have sliced salmon, cut it into small pieces (about bite size). If you got salmon ends, it's already cut up so you don't have to do anything.
  3. Fish out the artichokes from the jar (maybe 4 or 5 pieces) and pat them dry with a paper towel.
  4. Slice the onion (thin slices).
  5. Peel and slice the cucumber (thinly).
  6. Wash the spinach and pat dry.
  7. Put all the salad ingredients in a serving bowl and toss.
  8. Whisk the dressing ingredients in a small bowl.
  9. Top the salad with the dressing, a quick grinding of black pepper, and the shaved parmesan

Smoked Salmon Artichoke Salad Substitutions and Variations

  • Get fancy and use the blood oranges, or try Cara Cara oranges
  • If you like arugula use that or lambs lettuce or even kale (you want a bitter green for this so it contrasts with the sweet and salty flavors)
  • Top the salad with some mint or other “sweet” herbs
  • Try it with other smoked fish, like smoked trout

More Salmon and Artichoke Recipes

Smoked Salmon Pasta with Tomato Cream Sauce

Pasta with Tomato Artichoke Sauce Recipe

Egg and Pasta Gratin with Chives (add some smoked salmon for a bit of extra salty smoke)

Or add some of the salmon to scrambled eggs (cook the eggs, then toss in the salmon for a few seconds, just to heat it up)




Feta Brined Roast Chicken Recipe for One

Need something simple, yet elegant for dinner? This feta brined roast chicken is easy to make, but looks like something from a fancy restaurant.  Brine the chicken, let it sit overnight, and then mix a few ingredients together and bake.

The brine helps infuse the chicken with flavor, and (as a bonus) keeps it from drying out. It works just like the brine for a turkey, except this will taste much better! Feta cheese is particularly effective as a brine since it is packed in water, so it’s already moist. Blending it together creates a smooth, creamy brine that penetrates the chicken, keeping it tender and moist, even under high heat. The finished chicken doesn’t have a strong feta taste, but it will be rich, tender, and delicious.

Once the chicken is brined, you create a quick and easy spice rub from lemon zest, pepper, and oregano, blend that together, and spread it all over the chicken.  The feta cheese adds salty savor, the lemon a hint of tartness, and the oregano and spinach give the dish a fresh, bright flavor.  The original dish called for arugula, but I’m not a fan, so I used spinach instead.

Taking the chicken out early before you cook it helps it dry out and allows the skin to become crisper when the chicken is roasted.

Add pan-friend potatoes, or oven roasted Greek potatoes for a full meal.

You could eat this all by yourself, or increase the recipe and serve it for company.




Feta Brined Roast Chicken

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

Category: dinner

Cuisine: Greek

one

Feta Brined Roast Chicken

Easy and elegant, with a bit of planning this Feta Brined Roast Chicken requires only a few ingredients. Just brine, season, and roast.

Ingredients

  • 1 oz feta cheese, crumbled (divided)
  • 1/2 C water
  • pinch of kosher salt
  • 1 chicken thigh
  • 1 tsp black pepper, freshly ground
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 lemon (you'll need some zest and two slices)
  • 1 T olive oil
  • handful spinach, washed and patted dry

Instructions

  1. First brine the chicken. This can be done the day before, or in the morning. Combine half the feta and the water in a blender or mini chopper.
  2. Pour the feta/water mixture into a ziploc bag and add the chicken. Swish it around to coat.
  3. Let that sit overnight (or all day).
  4. Take the chicken out of the bag, wipe it off, and discard the brine. Let it come to room temperature (for about an hour).
  5. Mix the pepper, oregano, and about 3/4 tsp lemon zest together in a small bowl.
  6. Rub the mixture all over the chicken thigh.
  7. Cut two slices of lemon.
  8. Pre-heat the oven to 400.
  9. Pour the olive oil onto a small roasting pan (the one from your toaster oven will do just fine).
  10. Heat the pan on top of the stove on high heat, until the oil smokes.
  11. Add a lemon slice to the pan, and place the chicken on top of it, skin side up.
  12. Put the pan in the oven and cook for 30-35 minutes.
  13. Spread the spinach on a plate and top with the chicken. Squeeze the juice from the remaining lemon slice over the chicken and then top with the rest of the feta cheese.

Feta Brined Roast Chicken Substitutions and Variations

  • swap the oregano for rosemary
  • add a clove of minced garlic to the spice rub
  • try it with chicken breasts
  • use whole cloves of garlic and let them roast and caramelize
  • want more of a bite? double the amount of black pepper

More Feta and Chicken Recipes

Penne with Feta Cheese, Sun-dried Tomatoes, and Olives

Spinach and Feta Cheese Omelette

Homemade Chicken Shawarma with Yogurt Sauce