Roasted Root Vegetable Medley

This roasted root vegetable medley is a product of a bit of serendipity and a few internet searches. My local grocery delivery service was offering a farm share at a reduced price (and reduced size). I’ve wanted to try this for some time, but most of the boxes are way too much for one. So I pounced. And ended up with a box of mizuna (Japanese mustard greens) which I really liked, turnips, carrots, and sweet potatoes.

So, what to do with them? I’ve never made anything with sweet potatoes, and I’ve only used turnips for soup. I found this recipe for roasted sweet potatoes, and thought, well why not add more root vegetables, roast them all together, and make it a medley?

Potatoes and carrots are both sweet to start with.  Turnips start out a bit pungent and strong, but roasting them transforms that sharp, almost bitter, flavor into something sweet and slightly peppery, which is a good foil for the sweet carrots and potatoes.

This recipe takes advantage of that change and adds a bit of heat from chili powder, cumin, and paprika. And it’s easy too. Just peel and cut up the veggies, sprinkle them with some spices, toss in some olive oil, and pop it all in the oven.

Cook this with some roasted chicken (like the recipe I used for the chicken in my apple almond chicken salad). They both cook at the same temperature, and for the same time.  Then you only have to “cook” once to get a whole meal. Tricky huh?

 







Roasted Root Vegetable Medley Substitutions and Variations

  • Try different potatoes, such as yellow or red
  • Experiment with different root vegetables, like celery root or parsnips
  • Ditch the “hot” spices and use rosemary, balsamic vinegar, and fresh garlic instead
  • Try this with some butternut squash (technically not a root vegetable, but still good)

More Root Vegetable Recipes

honey mustard glazed carrotsHoney Mustard Glazed Carrots for One

Seems fancy, but it’s really easy to prepare. Another recipe that’s both sweet and savory (from the mustard).  This will also pair beautifully with roast chicken, and perhaps a glass of chardonnay.

crispy garlic basil potato bitesCrispy Garlic Basil Potato Bites

Little bite-size pieces of potato heaven that are crispy outside and fluffy inside. Easier than making French fries, and a lot less messy too. Plus there’s garlic! And basil.

 

skin on garlic mashed potatoesSkin On Garlic Mashed Potatoes

Because potatoes, especially mashed potatoes, are really a food group. Right? These leave the skin on, so they’re less work. Then there’s half and half and garlic, for a warm, creamy mouthful of delight.

Dill Caper Potato Salad

Nothing really says summer like potato salad (at least in America). It’s a staple of barbecues, picnics, and outdoor parties. This dill caper potato salad recipe comes via Smitten Kitchen via Bon Appetit via Rosanne Cash (daughter of Johnny).

I modified it a bit, but the essence of it is, I think, the same. First, I substituted yellow potatoes for red.  Second, I used capers rather than pickles. Third, I left out the hard boiled egg (because I was low on eggs and wanted them for something else). And finally, I swapped yellow onion for red.

The key here is the crunchy sour/sweet flavor of the capers paired with the starchy potatoes and the lemony, sweet dill.

And, since I don’t like that much dressing, I cut that too (even Deb said it was a bit much the original way).

The odd thing is, I was writing up the recipe, and I realized I hadn’t written down the reduced measurements (duh). So, I went back to the original to see what the amounts should be (planning to divide by 8).  Then I noticed she’d said that the dressing was enough for 150% of the original quantity of potatoes.

Since my brain balked at calculating how to get 150% down to whatever fraction is appropriate, I winged it and wrote down what I thought would work.
At the end, there was another note to use half the dressing and then only add more if you felt it needed it. Seems that amount of dressing would have worked for twice as many potatoes, as well as 150%. Then I thought, wait, better divide by 16 then just to make sure.

I started to do that, and found my “guessestimates” were exactly accurate. The only thing that was off was the capers, which I had consciously and deliberately reduced a bit.

Anyway, on to the recipe!




Dill Caper Potato Salad Substitutions and Variations

  • add a hard boiled egg
  • use red onion
  • if you use pickles, incorporate some of the pickle juice into the dressing
  • try white wine vinegar instead of apple cider vinegar
  • cut the mayo with some yogurt or sour cream

More Potato Recipes

dijon mustard vinaigrette potato saladFrench Dijon Mustard Vinaigrette Potato Salad

Delicious potato salad without the heavy mayo dressing. Get your starch fix here! Good warm or chilled.

 

mixed greens egg potato chicken saladMixed Greens Egg Potato and Chicken Salad with Mustard Vinaigrette

A great way to get your veggies and clean out the fridge. All you have to cook is an egg, and add leftover chicken.  Or skip the chicken and make it vegetarian.

roasted paprika potatoesRoasted Paprika Potatoes

Think extra-thick French fries.  These are crispy outside, fluffy inside. Great comfort food, which my grandma used to make me.

 

skin on garlic mashed potatoesSkin On Garlic Mashed Potatoes

No peeling! No kidding. These mashed potatoes are rich, creamy, and super-easy.  The garlic mellows out and sweetens as you cook it.




Crispy Garlic Basil Potato Bites

If you’ve been following this blog for a while, you know I loooove starch: pasta, rice, potatoes, you name it. Especially the noodles and the potatoes.  The trouble with the potatoes though, is that baking them takes a while. Yes, I know you can microwave them, but the texture isn’t right.  Or, you can fry them. That’s faster. On the other hand, cutting up and frying French fries still takes a while, uses lots of oil, and it’s messy.  However, there is a solution! The answer is these crispy garlic basil potato bites.  They’re bite size pieces of crispy, fragrant, fluffy potato heaven.

You cook them in a skillet, with just a couple of teaspoons or so of oil, and a bit of butter. Unlike a baked potato, they’re ready in under 25 minutes!  And the only thing you really need to chop is the potato. Yay!

The potatoes end up crispy and brown on the outside, and creamy on the inside. Almost like French fries (but much easier) and with an extra flavor boost from the garlic and the basil.

I adapted this from a recipe that called for making the dish with sage leaves.  I had none, so I used basil leaves instead. It would also be good with rosemary (preferably fresh). The garlic clove is left whole, so it adds lots of flavor without being overpowering.  Also, the recipe said to peel the potatoes, but I’m lazy, so I didn’t bother.  Besides, more vitamins that way!

Not to mention, it’s an easy side dish that doesn’t require a lot of fussing.  And, it goes well with crispy lemon chicken, a lamb chop, or meatloaf.  You can pop the chicken in the oven and then start the potatoes about half way through. Or, start a lamb chop about halfway through cooking the potatoes.  Great with a hamburger too (you may have spotted them in the background of last week’s newsletter).




Crispy Garlic Basil Potato Bites Substitutions and Variations

  • Use different fresh herbs, such as rosemary, oregano, or sage
  • Add more garlic
  • Try some hot pepper flakes
  • Or, add some crispy bacon
  • Try the potatoes with lemon, garlic, and sage

More Potato Side Dish Recipes

skin on garlic mashed potatoesSkin On Garlic Mashed Potatoes

Creamy, buttery, and sweet (yes sweet) from gently cooked garlic that mellows as it cooks.  My sister-in-law is a potato fiend (worse than me) and this is her favorite.

 

roasted paprika potatoesRoasted Paprika Potatoes

These are tossed in olive oil and dusted with paprika, then cooked slowly in a hot oven.  Crispy outside, fluffy inside.

 

dijon mustard vinaigrette potato saladFrench Dijon Mustard Vinaigrette Potato Salad

Since this is French potato salad, it’s made with olive oil, lemon juice, and Dijon mustard. No mayo in sight. It’s good for picnics (no mayo), and you don’t even have to peel the potatoes!

dill caper potato saladDill Caper Potato Salad

A staple of barbecues, picnics, and outdoor parties. This one is a bit different from the usual mayonnaise-heavy salad. Instead, it’s got sour/sweet capers and lemony, sweet dill.

 




Garlic Ginger Turmeric Rice

An online food group I belong to is celebrating “rice month.” The idea is to highlight a recipe featuring, well rice.  Someone suggested that nearly every culture uses rice so everyone ought to be able to find something to fit the theme.  Unfortunately, I come from a long line of noodle and dumpling people.  So, at first I was stumped.  What could I possibly make for this challenge?  Then I had an idea.  I could borrow a “sister” culture!  Eastern European Jewish people focus heavily on noodles, but the Sephardim (from Asia, India, the Middle East, etc.) have plenty of rice dishes.  So, I looked through my cookbooks and found garlic ginger turmeric rice.

It’s a Bene Israel recipe, meaning that it was created by the Jewish population in India.  You might almost call it a pulao. I’ve adapted this recipe from The Book of Jewish Food.  Her version served six.  Mine is about three servings (because extra rice is always good; more on that later).

This particular rice dish is packed with garlic, ginger, green cardamon pods, and a pinch of turmeric for that beautiful yellow color. It’s tasty (and it fights germs too, which made it even more appealing since I’m still fighting the creeping crud!).  Don’t be put off by all the garlic and the ginger, both start out spicy and sharp but mellow and become almost sweet as they cook.  The cardamom adds a complex taste; it’s a bit minty, with a hint of citrus and a spicy/warm flavor.  The original calls for basmati rice (which I didn’t have), but ordinary long grain white rice will do just as well. If you use the basmati rice, rinse it several times before starting to cook it.

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Turn Your Garlic Ginger Turmeric Rice Side Dish into A Main Dish

As is, this is a side dish. But with a bit of extra effort, it can become a main dish too.  There are a couple of ways to do this. For example, you could make it more substantial by cooking up some chicken or adding leftover pre-cooked chicken to the rice. Or, cook up some spinach and fry and egg (in the same pan if you want), and add that to the top.  You can do the same thing with the leftovers a few days. later. Instant food!

The recipe says that for special occasions, this dish was often served topped with blanched almonds and raisins. While this wasn’t a fancy occasion, I decided to do it anyway. I didn’t have blanched almonds, so I just roughly chopped a few whole ones.  Soak the raisins in water a bit before you use them, in order to soften them.

More Rice Recipes

easy lentils and rice recipeEasy Lentils and Rice Recipe

Super easy to make, and has a surprise ingredient you probably don’t expect.  Maybe not pretty, but healthy and tasty! And uses pantry ingredients too.

 

black beans and rice recipe one personBlack Beans and Rice Recipe for One Person

A complete meal (and complete protein too). I’ve adapted this from a Cuban-Colombian friend’s recipe.  It can also be adjusted to make soup!

 

lamb merguez sausage with rice and vegetablesLamb Merguez Sausage with Rice and Vegetables

Bring some heat with spicy lamb sausage from Morocco. Don’t worry, the carrots, eggplant, and sweet spices tone it down.

 




Oven Roasted Greek Potatoes

I just discovered these recently.  They are often served for Greek Easter (which is in a few weeks). I am not Greek, and I don’t observe Easter, but I am always a fan of potatoes (and starch generally). I really don’t have much of a sweet tooth, but I do have a fat/carb tooth. So, oven roasted Greek potatoes definitely caught my eye!

These are pretty easy to make and don’t require any special ingredients (always a bonus). I used Yukon Gold potatoes (I am a potato fan, but not a russet fan as I find them too floury).  I didn’t bother to peel them either.  Why waste the vitamins in the peel?  And why do extra work if you don’t have to? I am always in favor of shortcuts, particularly if it means less cleanup.

Besides, the skins of Yukon Gold potatoes are thinner than russets, so peeling isn’t necessary.  If you do use russets, you probably ought to peel them, as the peels are tougher and heavier.

The result is slightly crispy outside, and fluffy inside.  These would pair nicely with roast chicken, or roast lamb.  If you make lamb, use the pan drippings instead of the chicken broth.

I made them in the toaster oven because I didn’t want to heat up the whole oven just for potatoes. Plus it was easier to take the tray out to add the lemon juice and the chicken broth, since my oven is squashed in the corner of the kitchen area.




 

Oven Roasted Greek Potatoes Substitutions and Variations

  • swap the chicken broth for some tomato paste
  • use fresh oregano instead of dried (or add some at the end)
  • add some shallots and mix that with the oil, lemon, oregano to make a vinaigrette
  • top with some feta cheese
  • or try some Parmesan (not terribly traditional, but couldn’t hurt)
  • if you don’t like red pepper flakes, use black pepper instead

More Potato Recipes

skin on garlic mashed potatoesSkin On Garlic Mashed Potatoes

A rich, creamy starch bomb perked up with garlic. No peeling!

 

roasted paprika potatoesRoasted Paprika Potatoes

A childhood favorite (thanks grandma). She’d make these for me as a special treat. Think fries without the frying part.

 

dijon mustard vinaigrette potato saladFrench Dijon Mustard Vinaigrette Potato Salad

If you’d rather skip the mayo in your potato salad, this is for you. There isn’t any. Instead, this salad is made with a mustard vinaigrette. It’s much lighter, and I think tastier too.

 

crispy garlic basil potato bitesCrispy Garlic Basil Potato Bites

Crispy. Garlic. Potato. Do I have to say anything else?  These are mini bite-size pieces of potato heaven.

 




Roasted Butternut Squash with Brown Sugar and Vanilla

Ever finish eating something and immediately want to eat it again?  That’s what happened with this roasted butternut squash with brown sugar and vanilla. I finished it, and wanted more! Sadly, it was the last of the squash and the last of the nuts.  However, squash is definitely on my shopping list for my next trip to the supermarket.

What made this recipe so good?  The vanilla and nuts almost made me feel as if I were eating a cookie or some sort of dessert rather than a vegetable.  It was sweet, without being cloying, as there’s very little sugar in it.  Topping it with a mixture of nuts and craisins (dried, sweetened cranberries) added a bit of crunch and a sweet/tart tang.

The original version of this recipe (which I found on the Neilsen-Massey web site), called for vanilla sugar. Since I didn’t have any and had no interest in going out and searching for some in the stores, I simply added a bit of vanilla to some brown sugar instead. As far as I’m concerned it worked perfectly, and I didn’t have to buy an extra ingredient. Win win!

The nuts I used were an unsalted mixture from Trader Joe’s with hazelnuts, cashews and pecans.  Use whatever mix you like, although I think I would skip something with peanuts. The craisins were an unintentional bonus.  I had a few leftover from making the turkey chipotle enchilada recipe from a couple of weeks ago, and had thrown them in the bag of nuts.  I forgot that when I mixed them into the topping, but it turned out to be a good “accident.”

So, while this may look like a vegetable, it’s definitely a dessert in a clever vegetable disguise! In fact, I’m half-tempted to put it in the dessert category instead of as a side dish. Serve it with a simple piece of roast chicken or a pork chop. I baked a chicken thigh with some olive oil, oregano, a bit of garlic, and salt and pepper.




Butternut Squash with Brown Sugar and Vanilla Substitutions and Variations

  • Don’t have mixed nuts?  Try just plain walnuts or pecans instead
  • Use maple syrup instead of brown sugar
  • Toast the nuts first
  • Buy some puff pastry and spoon the squash into it—voilà butternut squash tart!

More Butternut Squash Recipes

curried butternut squash soup with applesCurried Butternut Squash Soup with Apples

Warm/spicy and sweet all at the same time. This soup is great for chilly days (or pantry cooking).

 

butternut squash cream sauce pastaButternut Squash Cream Sauce Recipe for One Person

Add sage and a touch of cream and you get a perfect pasta sauce. It’s rich, creamy and makes a nice change from the usual humdrum tomato sauce.

 

roasted cinnamon nutmeg butternut squashRoasted Cinnamon Nutmeg Butternut Squash

A classic combination that’s great with a simple main dish, like roast chicken.

 

 




Oven Roasted Lemon Garlic Broccoli

I know, broccoli is controversial (though not quite as much as brussels sprouts). Some love it, some hate it.  If you’re not a broccoli fan, this recipe for oven roasted lemon garlic broccoli might change your mind. Roasting helps reduce the bitterness and gives the broccoli a nutty flavor (from the caramelization).  It also makes the broccoli crispy outside, tender and sweet inside.

I have used frozen broccoli florets, because they cook more quickly (and I had a big bag of them). This is also more practical, since it’s tough for one person to eat an entire head of broccoli all at once!  This way I can take out just what I need and the rest can stay frozen until I want it for something else.

Plus, frozen vegetables often have more vitamins and better nutrition than fresh vegetables do.  That’s because the frozen version has been picked and then preserved (by freezing) immediately, while fresh produce may have traveled for days from some other state (or even country) before it gets to your supermarket.

If you have fresh broccoli (or a farmer’s market nearby), you can use that too.  Don’t toss out the stems, they are just as good as the florets.  They do cook faster (and better) if you remove the tough outer layer from the stems first. A vegetable peeler will work just fine for this.

You’ll also need to cook fresh broccoli a bit longer (since the frozen broccoli has been blanched first).  Roast the fresh broccoli for about 25 minutes. If you like it super-crispy, roast it for half an hour (turning it once).




Oven Roasted Lemon Garlic Broccoli Substitutions and Variations

  • Toast some breadcrumbs or panko and sprinkle them over the broccoli
  • Sprinkle some pine nuts or chopped walnuts over the broccoli
  • Make it a full meal by topping it with a fried egg or mixing the cooked broccoli with some pasta
  • Use the same roasting technique and change the seasoning to make it Asian with garlic, ginger, soy sauce and sesame oil

More Broccoli Dishes

pasta with broccoli, mushrooms, and chicken sausagePasta with Broccoli, Mushrooms, and Chicken Sausage

Easy, delicious, and adaptable. If you don’t have sausage, use bacon. No broccoli? Try asparagus instead.  It’s got all your veggies, your protein, and your starch in a single bowl.

Lmab keema with potatoes and broccoliLamb Keema with Potatoes and Broccoli

A sort of South Asian shepherd’s pie. Made with ground lamb, this isn’t overly spicy, and only needs one pot. Ready in about half an hour.

More Vegetable Side Dishes

honey mustard glazed carrotsHoney Mustard Glazed Carrots for One

Savory mustard, tender sweet carrots, and a little bit of honey. These carrots go great with roast chicken, pork, or a steak.

 

sauteed garlic parmesan spinachSautéed Garlic Parmesan Spinach

An Italian side dish that’s fairly pantry-friendly too. The original version was too much bother, so I simplified it. It’s now also time and effort friendly.  Great with some grilled fish.

 




Skin On Garlic Mashed Potatoes

It’s suddenly fall-like here in NY, with cooler weather and even a few leaves starting to turn.  So, time to start thinking about comfort food. And what better comfort food than skin on garlic mashed potatoes.

I’m posting this partly in honor of my sister-in-law, who loves mashed potatoes.  She practically thinks they are a food group. When she married my brother, I included a larger version of this recipe in a mini-cookbook we made for her.  Now, many years later, I make them slightly differently: not just mashed potatoes, but skin on garlic mashed potatoes.  It’s less work, less cleanup and more nutrition. Win win win!

The original recipe calls for milk, but I was feeling decadent, so I went with half and half here.  Use milk if you prefer.  Or, even a bit of cream.

Make sure to use thin skinned potatoes that are suitable for boiling and mashing.  I like to use either white potatoes, (sometimes called Eastern potatoes), or Yukon gold.  The skins on the white potatoes are thinner than Russets, which makes them better for a recipe that calls for leaving the skin on the potato.  Yukon gold are naturally more creamy and buttery tasting.  Also, I’ve never particularly liked Russets, they seem floury to me. They’re higher in starch, and don’t reheat well. They also don’t hold their shape (not an issue for mashing, but a problem for potato salad or soup).




Skin on Garlic Mashed Potatoes Substitutions and Variations

  • Top with some scallions
  • Add a few rosemary leaves
  • Try roasting the garlic, instead of boiling it with the potatoes
  • Stir in some freshly grated parmesan cheese

More Potato Recipes

dijon mustard vinaigrette potato saladFrench Dijon Mustard Vinaigrette Potato Salad

If you’d rather skip the mayo in your potato salad, this recipe is for you.  There isn’t any mayo. It’s got a mustard vinaigrette dressing instead.

 

roasted paprika potatoesRoasted Paprika Potatoes

One of my favorite comfort foods as a child, these are crispy outside and fluffy inside. No frying (but you might think they’re extra-tasty steak fries).

 

dill caper potato saladDill Caper Potato Salad

Sour/sweet capers, lemony dill, and a light hand on the dressing combined for an easy summer potato salad.

 

belgian potato salade liegoiseBelgian Potato Salade Liegoise

A potato salad that’s hearty enough for a meal all by itself.  Cook the potatoes, green beans, and bacon (or sausage), whip up a quick vinaigrette, and you’ve got lunch.

 




Rosemary Olive Oil Broiled Eggplant

I first learned to make this eggplant dish when I was visiting a cousin in Boston. He was living in a rambling house with lots of roomies and a student budget.  Creativity was important!  This meltingly tender broiled eggplant infused with olive oil and flecked with fresh rosemary takes full advantage of seasonal produce.  Just grab some of the fresh eggplants popping up in your local farmer’s market and make this super simple recipe.

Since this recipe is made nearly entirely with pantry staples, all you have to buy is the eggplant.  Fresher eggplants are less bitter than their out-of-season cousins and the standard dark, nearly black supermarket offerings. And, the farmer’s market should have a much wider selection.  I used Graffiti eggplant (streaky purple), but white eggplant, or fairy eggplant (the smaller streaky variety, which is particularly tender) works just as well.

Look for smaller eggplants with firm skin.  A wrinkled eggplant is an old eggplant.  The smaller ones are sweeter too.  Check the stem to make sure it’s fresh; it should be free of mold or mushiness.  An eggplant that’s heavy for its size is better.  Lighter ones are likely to be hollow and less fleshy (so less to eat).

There’s some slightly inaccurate folk wisdom about “male” and “female” eggplants, with males having fewer seeds. The flowers are both male and female, but the fruit isn’t. However, if you want fewer seeds, check the bottom of the eggplant.  There’s an indentation which is sometimes oval and sometimes round. Eggplants with an oval indentation seem to have fewer seeds than the round ones.  So pick the oval eggplant (because you want fruit, not seeds).




Rosemary Olive Oil Broiled Eggplant Substitutions and Variations

  • If you can plan ahead, pour a small quantity of olive oil into a separate, sealed jar.  Add a sprig of rosemary and let it sit.  The flavor will infuse into the oil
  • Add some zucchini to the eggplant
  • Or, put in a few slices of onion
  • Try some Romano or Manchego cheese instead of the Parmesan

More Eggplant Recipes

Sichuan Chinese Chicken and Eggplant with Garlic Sauce

Pasta alla Norma with Eggplant

Single Serving Eggplant Parmesan Recipe

Vegetarian Eggplant Sandwich for One Person




Lemony Cucumber Salad Recipe with Dill

A lemony cucumber salad is the perfect antidote to a brutally hot day. And, with July nearly here, the temperature (at least in NY) is forecast to soar well into the 90s! This salad is cool, refreshing, and you don’t have to cook anything.  It’s also ready in about five minutes. So, it’s great when you have a bad case of the hungries and don’t want to wait a long time to eat (look further down the page for tips on making this a full meal).

I made my cucumber salad with romaine lettuce, English cucumber (the long seedless kind), fresh lemon juice, and dill.  If you use the English cucumber, you don’t have to peel it; which is a welcome extra shortcut.  I used dried dill, but fresh is even better, if you have some.

Made this way, it’s a wonderful, easy side salad, which would go nicely with some salmon in yogurt dill sauce.

On the other hand, if you would rather have a meal that’s a bit heartier,  toss in some sort of extra protein. You could add a sliced hardboiled egg,  a bit of crumbled feta or goat cheese, or even shredded leftover chicken.  With the protein, the recipe as written is enough for lunch.  If you want to have it for dinner, double the quantities of everything.




Taste the dressing before you add the olive oil and then adjust the seasonings if needed.  Adding the oil last helps the dressing emulsify (blend together better).

Lemony Cucumber Salad Recipe Substitutions and Variations

  • Add some sliced bell pepper
  • Garnish with freshly snipped scallions
  • Add protein (hard boiled egg, chicken, feta)
  • Vary the greens you use (try green leaf lettuce, arugula, or a salad mixture)
  • Add some chopped tomato

More Cucumber and Salad Recipes

blueberry and spinach salad with fetaBlueberry Spinach Salad with Feta Cheese and Walnuts 

Sweet summer blueberries, salty feta, and earthy spinach, with an added walnut crunch. Toss this together in a few minutes (no cooking needed).

 

israeli chopped saladChopped Israeli Salad for One Person

A refreshing side dish that’s great alongside a sandwich or even for breakfast (yes, breakfast, with some olives and pita and lebne). Delicious.

 

spicy sesame noodlesSpicy Sesame Noodles Recipe for One Person

Why bother with takeout when you can make it at home. It’s cheaper, and you know what’s in it.  The cool cucumber offsets the spicy peanut sauce.

 

peanut butter and cucumber sandwich on ryePeanut Butter and Cucumber on Rye Bread

Speaking of peanut butter and cucumber… I know what you’re thinking. This is “weird.” Maybe. But it’s also delicious. Don’t think peanut butter and cucumber, think sweet and crunchy as a foil for salty and creamy.